On This Day — Newspaper Heiress Patricia Hearst Sentenced to Seven Years (September 24 1976)

“I frankly don’t think it’s going to be a successful war on terrorism until law enforcement agencies like the FBI are willing to share with other law enforcement agencies. If they can’t share information, there’s no way this war can be won.”

Patricia Campbell Hearst

On September 24 1976, newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was sentenced to seven years in prison for her part in a 1974 bank robbery. Follow us on Twitter: @INTEL_TODAY

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Patricia Campbell Hearst (born February 20, 1954) is the granddaughter of American publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst, who became internationally known for events following her 1974 kidnapping and physical violation by a domestic American terrorist group known as the Symbionese Liberation Army.

Hearst was found nineteen months after being abducted, by which time she was a fugitive wanted for serious crimes.

She was held in custody, despite speculation that her family’s resources would prevent her from spending time in jail.

At her trial, the prosecution suggested that she had joined the Symbionese Liberation Army of her own volition. Hearst said she had been raped and threatened with death. She was found guilty of bank robbery.

On February 2 1979, Hearst was released from prison after only serving twenty-two months, her seven-year prison term having been commuted by President Jimmy Carter.

On January 20 2001, Patty Hearst was granted a full pardon by President Bill Clinton on the final day of his presidency.

Patty Hearst Sentenced – Sept 24 1976 | Today In History |

REFERENCES

Patty Hearst Trial: A Chronology — Famous Trial

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On This Day — Newspaper Heiress Patricia Hearst Sentenced to Seven Years (September 24 1976)

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